On The Road To The Highlands

On The Road To The Highlands

With a full belly of very rich fine dining, I slid back into the drivers seat of the battered van.

My food pilgrimage from my old Steak House in Cornwall to an award-winning beef producer in Banchory was now well underway, but I still had half the journey left to go.

The first day’s drive had taken me all the way to Manchester, where I’d marvelled at the sheer wealth of galleries and eaten my fill at Simon Rogan’s The French.

However, I still had another 350 miles left to go and that van wasn’t driving itself.

After a difficult night’s sleep in the van (spending over £100 on my dinner the day before had left me rather short for a room in a hotel), I pulled out of Manchester still feeling oddly full from my dinner the night before. Luckily my destination for the day would take me to a much more comfortable night’s sleep at some luxury lodges in Crieff, around 250 miles away. Buried in the midst of the Highlands, I was looking forward to spending a night surrounded by the mountains and trees of Scotland’s visually stunning landscape.

Firstly, though, a quick stop had to be made at Glasgow.

Out of all the stereotypes that have been piled on top of Scotland – a lack of sunshine and an obsession with deep-frying chocolate bars – there is one that holds absolutely true. Anyone working in the food industry for long enough will know at least one Scottish chef and they will, more than likely, be an exceptional one. All the major cities in Scotland are home to some truly spectacular restaurants, so I felt it would be simply negligent to not stop by in Glasgow for a quick bite.

Although I’d heard good things about the recently opened Two Fat Ladies at the Buttery, I elected for something a little out of the ordinary instead.

The Ubiquitous Chip has been serving a rich example of Scotland’s cuisine since 1971.

Opened by Ronnie Clydesdale with the aim of bringing traditional Scottish cookery to the forefront once more, The Chip (as it’s informally known) serves a fine dining take on classic Scottish cooking. Now I’d officially crossed the border and had been surrounded by the wonderfully rich accent of it’s indigenous people, there was nothing more that I wanted than a traditional Scottish meal to ground me culturally.

To start I enjoyed The Chip’s signature dish – venison haggis with champit tatties, carrot crisp and neep cream. Wonderfully seasoned with just enough give in the meat, the modest portion left me wanting more in a good way. To follow, I elected something a little more daring. Galloway roe deer was prepared with a bramble gel as well as vanilla, peanut and cocoa. This was a strange blend that I wasn’t convinced would work completely – however, I ended up being pleasantly surprised.

Although I was risking over indulging again, I couldn’t quite resist the sweets menu.

Once more, The Chip’s speciality stuck out like a sore thumb. An exquisitely presented oatmeal ice cream was presented with poached brambles and oats. I still had another hundred miles to get to Crieff, I chose to pair this with stiff shot of Whiskey…when in Rome!

After suffering another minor heart attack at the sight of the bill – I spent an hour walking in Glasgow’s peaceful Necropolis. Although it might have been an oddly grim way to spend an hour, the views that this cemetery offers you of the city are unparalleled.

When I finally got back to the van, my head had cleared and I was ready to get back on the road to Crieff.

Category : Food & Drink , Sights of Scotland